Monthly Archives

January 2020

Five questions for William Bryant Rozier

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Five questions for William Bryant Rozier

The Journal Gazette

January 20, 2020

1. As we observe Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 91st birthday, the average American is far too young to have any direct memory of him and his times. What was it about his life that we should be celebrating today?

Dr. King was one of the many voices of the movement who rose to be one of the strongest. He’ll always be an example of what happens when change meets opportunity meets leadership.

William Bryant Rozier, managing editor of Fort Wayne Ink Spot, stands outside the African/African-American Historical Society Museum on Douglas Avenue.

2. It’s a day when lots of blacks and whites come together to honor King’s vision of a nation where everybody counts. But some would say you shouldn’t have to set aside a day to get along. Is the King holiday a worthwhile tradition? Are we still fighting for civil rights?

Yes. We should keep setting aside a holiday. It should be more than a day … 24 hours isn’t enough.

3. King seemed to know he would eventually have to give his life for the cause of civil rights. How do you think he summoned such extraordinary courage?

He definitely knew death was a possibility. To summon the courage, I think he looked at the courage displayed by all of the civil rights fighters and those slain for the cause. He looked around him.

4. Will there ever be another leader like King? If there were, what would he or she be focusing on today?

Yes, I think there’ll be another King. I could see some of the younger kids who are growing up now … motivated and social-media-savvy … stepping into that role. He or she would be thinking toward the future, like fighting infant mortality. And civil rights for minorities, women and LGBTQ individuals.

5. Fort Wayne Ink Spot will be two years old next month. What hopes do you and your staff have for 2020?

We’ve brought in a handful of new writers and have expanded our admin staff. In addition to our usual output, and publishing new dedicated issues – Civil Rights, Comedy, HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), and Infant Mortality – the Ink Spot will be producing some cool special projects.

Focus on nutrition to start the new year

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Focus on nutrition to start the new year

| WANE TV

January 11, 2020

ating healthier is on the mind of many in the New Year. It’s a time many people try to transform their diets, but you want to make sure you do it the right way.

Kelley Marvin, owner and founder of Inspired Nutrition by Kelley, stopped by Studio 15 for some tips.

Kelley Marvin gives viewers 15 tips to improve their diets in 2020.

Her biggest suggestion for anyone looking to have a better diet is to ask where your food is coming from. She says knowing the source of your food is key to bettering yourself.

Kelley also suggests making small changes to improve your lifestyle.

If you need a little extra boost, Kelley offers services through her business. You can click here for more information.

Fort Wayne Magazine People of the Year

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Fort Wayne Magazine People of the Year

| WANE TV

December 7, 2019

he last cover of 2019 for Fort Wayne Magazine features People of the Year. Ten people have been selected to represent the People of the Year.

Fort Wayne Magazine says these people are only givers, meaning they only give time, ideas, and experience. They give their 110%.

Fort Wayne Magazine says they’re a diverse group, “Who through their service to others, have made significant contributions to the arts, education, social services, business and civic engagement.”

On the cover of the December issue is Aaron Robles of Founders Spark. He is featured alongside nonprofit leaders, husband and wife duos, and a school superintendent.

Fort Wayne Magazine says they take about 15 to 17 people and narrowed it down to this list. This is the 2nd year the magazine as put together People of the Year.

Aaron Robles on the cover of Fort Wayne Magazine’s People of the Year issue in 2019.

Pick up an issue of Fort Wayne Magazine at over a dozen area businesses, including Kroger, or click here.

Hetty Arts Pastry offers donuts and other delectable desserts

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Hetty Arts Pastry offers donuts and other delectable desserts

| WANE TV

November 16, 2019

rom legendary donuts to artfully crafted wedding cakes, Hetty Arts has made a name for herself in Fort Wayne, with Hetty Arts Pastry. She is a trained pastry chef that chose to bring her business to the Midwest and in our case right here in Fort Wayne.

Getty grew up in the Netherlands, and was introduced to pastry at a young age.

Hetty Arts Pastry proudly serves the Fort Wayne community with delectably delicious treats.

In lieu of a traditional store front, Hetty Arts Pastry operates as a freelance kitchen, with a small pastry truck. You can find where she’ll be by heading to Hetty Arts Pastry’s Facebook page.

Learn more about her business by clicking here.

Hetty Arts has been featured in Fort Wayne Magazine multiple times. Find out what’s in this month’s issue by clicking here.

Fort Wayne Power Circle celebrates diversity, inclusion

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Fort Wayne Power Circle celebrates diversity, inclusion

| Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly

November 15, 2019

Demographic representation improved locally with the election of three African Americans, including two women, to the Fort Wayne City Council. But, participants in panel discussion at a Founders Spark Power Circle celebration said the city remains far from approaching what it could achieve by improving inclusiveness.

The celebration took place Nov. 8 at Wunderkammer Co. on Fairfield Avenue in Fort Wayne. Aaron Robles, the founder of Founders Spark, led the discussion.

Aaron Robles, founder of Founders Spark, to the far left, led this panel discussion at its Nov. 8 Power Circle celebration at Wunderkammer Co. Other panelists included, from left, Clifford Clarke, who chairs the board of the Fort Wayne Black Chamber of Commerce; Melissa Rinehart, lead organizer for Welcoming Fort Wayne; and John Dortch, the Black Chamber’s CEO. Clarke and Dortch are local business owners.

Other panelists included Clifford Clarke, who chairs the board of the Fort Wayne Black Chamber of Commerce, John Dortch, its CEO, and Melissa Rinehart, lead organizer for Welcoming Fort Wayne. Clarke and Dortch are local business owners.

Founders Spark was created to strengthen connections in the entrepreneurial community and help provide aspiring entrepreneurs with the tools they need to succeed.

“Power Circle is Founders Spark’s attempt to help create more diversity and inclusion, and educate people on what those mean and how we can become advocates for other people,” Robles said at the outset of the event.

The subject is one he cares very deeply about as an immigrant from Mexico and a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals recipient, he said. DACA provides undocumented residents who came to the United States as children with renewable work permits and protection from deportation.

“The conversation is never over. There’s always more that we could do to educate people on race and gender and all these other types of entrepreneurs and people in our community that have certain hurdles that they have come across,” he said.

“What we want to do tonight is educate and figure out how we can all walk out of here empowered to help those people that need more help and how we can become more understanding and helpful neighbors to one another.”

Robles kicked off the discussion by asking panelists why they believed it was important to talk about diversity and inclusion.

“The data is overwhelming if you look at empirical studies,” Clarke said. “Diverse, inclusive organizations — companies and cities — outperform those that are less so. Strictly by the numbers, you should be looking for diversity and inclusion.

“The other thing that I often reference is that if you don’t have diversity and inclusion and you don’t pay attention to all the PhD studies and all the data, if you are a student of history, there is a tipping point where the disenfranchised cannot take it anymore, and that’s usually never good for society,” he said.

Conversations on the topic need to take place in Fort Wayne because too many of the city’s residents don’t understand the subject and its importance, Dortch said.

“I really think we have a job trying to educate people. We need to sit down and have a conversation about race, what is race and why is it the way it is,” he said.

The fact that the Nov. 5 election was the first in Fort Wayne’s history to vote three African Americans on to the City Council shows “we have an issue,” he said.

When most members of a person’s social and professional network value diversity and inclusion, even women who have endured gender discrimination can benefit from reminders about the amount of education still needed in the city, said Rinehart, a cultural anthropologist.

“Diversity is reality in the world today — cultural diversity — because biologically, we’re all related. So, it’s hard for me to pause and … see that not everyone thinks like that. So, I have to check myself that that person over there is not educated or experienced in the same way that I am,” she said.

Public officials who fail to properly acknowledge disadvantages imposed on a group through historic oppression and actually celebrate a symbol of that oppression need to give much more serious thought to the value of inclusion, Rinehart said.

From that perspective, establishing a local July 16 holiday celebrating the birthday of Gen. Anthony Wayne in a 6-3 vote this summer was not a proud moment for the Fort Wayne City Council, she said.

“There was a lot of criticism from myself and others — scholars from all around the country who have worked with the historical era with Anthony Wayne and the Miami,” she said. “A lot of tribal members have spoken up.”

Another proposal will be brought before the City Council to celebrate Native Americans, and Rinehart encouraged everyone at the Power Circle to attend that meeting in order to show support for the proposal in person.

The resolution celebrating National Native American Heritage Month was to be introduced on Nov. 12 and go to a vote on Nov. 19.

It would acknowledge and honor significant contributions Native Americans have made to the Fort Wayne community, including the more than 200 Myaamia citizens living in part of their ancestral homeland.